Financial Gravity Announces Chief Tax Strategist

Financial Gravity Holdings, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Pacific Oil Company (OTC: POIL), is pleased to announce Edward A. Lyon, JD, as Chief Tax Strategist.

Ed is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati College of Law, where he served as Executive Editor of the University of Cincinnati Law Review. He is currently an author, consultant, speaker, and a co-founder of TaxCoach™ Software, LLC, as well as the American Institute of Certified Tax Coaches. Ed leads the effort in researching and developing the latest tax practices and how those planning options are best applied for various client situations. He’s a member of many elite tax groups, as well as small business owner mentoring networks. Ed has written seven books on tax and financial planning, and is a sought-after speaker to accountants, financial professionals, and business owners throughout the country. He has appeared on over 300 radio and television broadcasts, with over two dozen national television appearances, including interviews on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and CNBC. Read more…

Giving You New Stuff on Giving

When Keith and I first launched TaxCoach back in 2005, we expected that as Washington tweaked the tax code over time, we would add and subtract strategy modules to help clients take advantage of the changes in the law.

We never expected that Congress would become so partisan and polarized that they could barely pass legislation naming a post office, let alone passing a federal budget (which never happened this year) or deal with emergencies like the Zika virus. So, while we’ve added modules here and there for new strategies like the domestic production activities deduction, there haven’t been any wholesale changes to the system. Read more…

Think About Your Franchise

Saturday afternoon, my girlfriend and I spent much of the day painting my daughter Margaret’s bedroom. (Apparently the bright green she picked when she was 10 years old was a little “robust” for her 16-year-old taste.) At one point, I ran out for another set of rollers and some more painters tape. My girlfriend asked me to pick up a Chick-fil-A sandwich for her on my way back. I said “sure,” and headed off to Target for supplies.

After I picked up the supplies, I pulled into the Chick-fil-A, and my heart sank. There was a long line of cars waiting at the drive-through. I knew that a line that long at the McDonalds down the street signaled a long wait, and I would be better off parking and going in to the store. Read more…